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Another Guest Crashed White House Dinner

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Another Guest Crashed White House Dinner

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Another Guest Crashed White House Dinner

Another Guest Crashed White House Dinner

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The Secret Service confirmed Monday that a third uninvited guest made it into the White House state dinner in November. The development comes amid an investigation into how an uninvited Virginia couple made their way into the party and shook hands with the president and several other dignitaries.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

That state dinner at the White House continues to make news for the wrong reasons. It turns out that Tareq and Michaele Salahi were not the only people to crash the dinner. The Secret Service has confirmed that another uninvited guest got into the White House, as NPR's Don Gonyea reports.

DON GONYEA: There was already a criminal investigation underway involving the Salahi's very unwelcome and very much photographed visit to the White House. But today, the Secret Service says the investigation into the slip-up has revealed that another person made it to the state dinner without an invite. The individual's identity has not been released, but in a statement, the Secret Service says it appears that the subject traveled from a local hotel where the official Indian delegation was staying. There was a security sweep there with the entire delegation handled by the State Department, then that delegation and the uninvited guest boarded a bus that took them all to the White House.

The Secret Service says there's nothing to indicate that this individual had contact with the president or first lady. So far there are no pictures. It is also not clear at this point if the person had any direct connection to the official delegation from India. The Secret Service says it will have no further comment because of the ongoing criminal investigation since the state dinner security procedures for all White House events have been enhanced.

Don Gonyea, NPR News, Washington.

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Third Person Crashed White House Dinner

The Secret Service admitted on Monday that a third unauthorized person penetrated the White House during a state dinner for India's prime minister in November.

Heard On 'All Things Considered'

Officials have been reviewing security procedures after an uninvited Virginia couple gained entrance to President Obama's first state dinner, which honored Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. Aspiring reality television stars Tareq and Michaele Salahi talked their way through security checkpoints and actually shook hands with the president and Singh at the glitzy Nov. 24 event.

In a written statement, the Secret Service confirmed that an unidentified person went to the Washington, D.C., hotel where the Indian delegation was staying, boarded a bus with the group and proceeded to the White House. Security for the delegation was being handled by the U.S. State Department.

"This individual went through all required security measures along with the rest of the official delegation at the hotel, and boarded a bus/van with the delegation guests en route to the White House," the Secret Service report said.

The Secret Service said there is no indication that the person came into contact with Obama. It is also not known whether the person had contact with the Indian prime minister.

Indian prime ministers have been targeted by assassins in the past. Indira Gandhi was assassinated in 1984. Her son, former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, was assassinated in 1991.

Secret Service officials said changes have already been put in place to prevent future security breaches.

An investigation into the security lapses is under way, but White House officials declined to offer any additional comments.

From NPR staff reports

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