Stashing Carbon Dioxide In Rocks Basalt formations off the East Coast of the U.S. could suck up a billion tons of carbon dioxide, according to a new study. Paleontologist Paul Olsen, of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, explains how to get the CO2 into the rocks, and why scientists believe it won't leak out.
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Stashing Carbon Dioxide In Rocks

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Stashing Carbon Dioxide In Rocks

Stashing Carbon Dioxide In Rocks

Stashing Carbon Dioxide In Rocks

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Basalt formations off the East Coast of the U.S. could suck up a billion tons of carbon dioxide, according to a new study. Paleontologist Paul Olsen, of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, explains how to get the CO2 into the rocks, and why scientists believe it won't leak out. Video: visit a New Jersey basalt quarry.

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