Survivor Of Two Atom Bombings Dies

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Tsutomu Yamaguchi died this week. He is the only person officially recognized as having survived the bombings of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. Despite the double radiation exposure, he lived to be 93 years old. Guest host Mary Louise Kelly remembers Yamaguchi, who, in his later years, wrote a memoir and spoke out against nuclear weapons.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Tsutomu Yamaguchi died this week. He is the only person officially recognized as having survived the bombings of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. Despite the double radiation exposure, he lived to be 93 years old. On August 6th, 1945, Mr. Yamaguchi was on a business trip to Hiroshima, when the United States dropped the first atomic bomb on the city. His eardrums burst and he was burned. But he survived and returned to his hometown of Nagasaki the next day. Two days later, the second bomb hit the city. Mr. Yamaguchi later said I thought the mushroom cloud had followed me from Hiroshima.

After the war, he worked for the occupying forces and in his later years wrote a memoir and spoke out against nuclear weapons. And just last month he was paid a visit by Hollywood director James Cameron. He wanted to discuss with him a film project about the bombings.

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