Cruise Ship Offers Permanent Residences

A company in Beverly Hills, Calif., plans to build a $1.1 billion cruise ship, and sell half the cabins as permanent homes. The Los Angeles Times reports condos aboard the Utopia will range from $3.7 million to $26 million. The ship is set to launch in 2013.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is high-end houseboat. If youve ever dreamed of escaping and living out your life on a permanent cruise, you might contact a company in Beverly Hills, California, which has plans to build a billion-dollar cruise ship, and sell half the cabins as permanent homes.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

Today, the Los Angeles Times reports that floating condos aboard the Utopia will range from $3.7 million to $26 million. A couple of years ago it might've been easy to get a loan to buy one of these cruising condos. Today it could be harder.

INSKEEP: Several years ago, another company also planned to build a luxury residential cruise ship, but only a third of the units sold. And no pun intended, the global economy began to sink - took on some water, the plan's founder wrecked on the shoals of the tough economy.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

AMOS: And I'm Deborah Amos.

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