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Demotion May Come in Tillman Case

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Demotion May Come in Tillman Case

Iraq

Demotion May Come in Tillman Case

Demotion May Come in Tillman Case

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Pat Tillman, pictured in 2003, a professional football star who put his NFL career on hold to serve in Afghanistan, was killed by friendly fire in 2004. AP Photos hide caption

toggle caption AP Photos

The U.S. Army is set to respond to the cover-up in the death of NFL star Pat Tillman — and the action they take is expected to be dramatic.

Tillman was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan three years ago, but the Army presented that he was a hero who died in battle. Details of his death were withheld for several weeks.

Now, the new Secretary of the Army, Pete Geren, is expected to recommend demoting a retired three-star general, Lt. Gen. Philip Kinsenger. This is just the first in a series of reprimands expected in the Tillman case. In all, nine officers — four of them generals — were involved in the investigation. Six are expected to receive letters of reprimand.

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