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Haitian School's Basketball Court Serves As Home

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Haitian School's Basketball Court Serves As Home

Latin America

Haitian School's Basketball Court Serves As Home

Haitian School's Basketball Court Serves As Home

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Roody Edme and his family run a private primary school in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. About three dozen people gathered on the school's outdoor basketball court, and they've been sleeping there since Tuesday's earthquake. They are afraid that aftershocks might knock the school down.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Deborah Amos, in for Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Soon after an earthquake struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti, some survivors gathered for what amounted to an informal roll call. People stood on the basketball court of a private school and looked around.

AMOS: One of the survivors was teacher Sameena Mulla(ph).

Ms. SAMEENA MULLA (Teacher): We had all the kids on the basketball court, and as we started to see our family and all of the teachers, I think, you know, we started to feel a little bit better that we could all see each other and whatever was going to happen, we were going to be there together.

AMOS: That gathering served as a reminder that the earthquake was a beginning as well as an end. Countless people have died.

INSKEEP: Countless survivors will look for someway to get through the coming days. The school is run by Sameena Mulla's father-in-law, Rudien May(ph).

Mr. RUDIEN MAY: People are chanting in the streets, praying, you know, it's very difficult because they know that from time to time they can experience aftershocks.

AMOS: And amid those aftershocks Sameena Mulla says people at the school have been sleeping outside.

Ms. MULLA: We have these big gym mats, so we pulled them all out to the center of the basketball court and everyone kind of piles on top of them.

INSKEEP: Mulla says they've been able to find at least one family member belonging to each of the students.

Ms. MULLA: (Unintelligible) like the worst is behind us, but it's started to get very cold and a lots of rain clouds seems to be moving in, and it was just very eerie, so we're all trying to talk about the fact that we're scared, and just calm ourselves down.

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