NPR logo

Making Music in the Motor City

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12257724/12257725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Making Music in the Motor City

Music

Making Music in the Motor City

Making Music in the Motor City

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12257724/12257725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After the riots of 1967, many musicians left Detroit for the West Coast. Motown singer Martha Reeves stayed in Detroit, and now serves on the City Council. Above, Reeves performs at the 'Motown 45' anniversary celebration in Los Angeles in 2004. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

In the 1960s Motown was king, and music coming out of Detroit topped the charts for a decade. But when Detroit burned, many musicians left for the West Coast. Martha Reeves, former lead singer of the Motown group Martha and the Vandellas, talks about why she decided to stay put.

Martha Reeves, former lead singer of the Motown group Martha and the Vandellas; member of the Detroit City Council

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.