Scott Simon In The Valley Of The Monkeys

On a recent trip to India, host Scott Simon and his family was impressed by India's majesty, chaos and genius. Simons shares details of his trip and the response to our recent social media survey.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

We had a number of requests on our Facebook page and other places for me to talk about our family's trip to India. Well, we had a wonderful time. We went to a wedding - Nishant Dahiya, an NPR staff member and his wife, Valentina Pasquale. We all rode elephants and camels; we saw Jaipur's Pink City, and the monks and monkeys living in harmony in the Valley of the Monkeys.

I'd wondered how our daughters would react to seeing so many beggars. They see and speak with homeless people in the U.S., but they're not used to both the numbers of beggars that you can see in India, and their persistence.

My wife was careful to tell our daughters that we are lucky to have enough to eat and wear and sleep in a safe, warm place at night. At one point, our 6-year-old looked and saw a man and asked, is he poor or is he lucky? At the moment, she doesnt speak of people being rich or poor. She asks if they're poor or lucky, and knows that she is among the lucky. Well, I hope she holds on to that view for a while.

Meanwhile, we were all impressed all over again by India's majesty, chaos and genius.

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