Photos: In A Haitian Field Hospital, A Baby Is Born

  • Obstetrician Anne Kathryn Goodman (center) oversees births at the Health and Human Services field hospital in Port-au-Prince. As of Friday morning, Jan. 22, six babies have been delivered at the field hospital.
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    Obstetrician Anne Kathryn Goodman (center) oversees births at the Health and Human Services field hospital in Port-au-Prince. As of Friday morning, Jan. 22, six babies have been delivered at the field hospital.
    All photos by John Poole/NPR/NPR
  • Expectant mother Veda Brazile writhes in pain from contractions in a medical tent at the HHS field hospital. Goodman (left) oversees her birthing process.
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    Expectant mother Veda Brazile writhes in pain from contractions in a medical tent at the HHS field hospital. Goodman (left) oversees her birthing process.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • Brazile grimaces during contractions as her husband, Tony Jean (right), holds her hand. Goodman gave her a small amount of morphine for the pain.
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    Brazile grimaces during contractions as her husband, Tony Jean (right), holds her hand. Goodman gave her a small amount of morphine for the pain.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • Brazile wrings her hands around her husband's neck, an expression of her pain.
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    Brazile wrings her hands around her husband's neck, an expression of her pain.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • Exhausted from the pain, Brazile asked Goodman to "reach in and pull the baby out." Goodman responded patiently that that is not how things work.
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    Exhausted from the pain, Brazile asked Goodman to "reach in and pull the baby out." Goodman responded patiently that that is not how things work.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • Expectant father Jean cries outside the birthing tent. He fears that by asking his wife to drink a lot of "Sport Milk," a type of protein drink, while pregnant, he has made the baby too big for birth. Goodman assures him this is not the case.
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    Expectant father Jean cries outside the birthing tent. He fears that by asking his wife to drink a lot of "Sport Milk," a type of protein drink, while pregnant, he has made the baby too big for birth. Goodman assures him this is not the case.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • After about 2 1/2 hours of labor, Sampson becomes the sixth baby born at the hospital. He later received care for a fast and irregular heartbeat — a complication of a difficult labor. He was cared for throughout the night and is now doing fine.
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    After about 2 1/2 hours of labor, Sampson becomes the sixth baby born at the hospital. He later received care for a fast and irregular heartbeat — a complication of a difficult labor. He was cared for throughout the night and is now doing fine.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • Proud and relieved, Jean holds his new baby just minutes after birth. Jean used to work in a textile factory before the earthquake. But the factory has collapsed and he and his wife do not know what they will do after they leave the field hospital.
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    Proud and relieved, Jean holds his new baby just minutes after birth. Jean used to work in a textile factory before the earthquake. But the factory has collapsed and he and his wife do not know what they will do after they leave the field hospital.
    Photos by John Poole/NPR
  • Dr. Goodman smiles after a long day at the field hospital. She is the hospital's only obstetrician/gynecologist and has overseen the delivery of the six babies born so far. She is a member of the Massachusetts 1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT).
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    Dr. Goodman smiles after a long day at the field hospital. She is the hospital's only obstetrician/gynecologist and has overseen the delivery of the six babies born so far. She is a member of the Massachusetts 1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT).
    Photos by John Poole/NPR

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