Stars Show Their Support For Haiti

Americans have donated hundreds of millions of dollars in relief money to Haiti since the earthquake. Last night, celebrities including George Clooney and Julia Roberts called on the world to give more in a telethon called "Hope For Haiti Now."

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AUDIE CORNISH, host:

Americans have donated hundreds of millions of dollars in relief money to Haiti since the earthquake 11 days ago. Last night, celebrities like George Clooney and Julia Roberts called on the world to give more in a telethon called "Hope for Haiti Now."

Ms. REESE WITHERSPOON (Actress): This is Reese Witherspoon and we really appreciate your call.

Mr. STEVEN SPIELBERG (Director): Hello, it's Steven Spielberg.

Unidentified Woman: Hi, Steven Spielberg, that's really cool to talk to you.

Mr. SPIELBERG: Well, it's cool to talk to you. Can I have your name?

CORNISH: They answered phones and shared stories from folks on the ground. The event was broadcast from Los Angeles, New York, London and Port-au-Prince and aired on all the major networks and some of the smaller ones too. Alicia Keys was the first performer, followed by many big acts - Taylor Swift, Neil Young and Stevie Wonder.

(Soundbite of song, "Bridge Over Troubled Waters")

Mr. STEVIE WONDER (Musician): (Singing) Like a bridge over troubled waters...

CORNISH: The donations will go to nonprofits like Oxfam America, the Red Cross and the new Clinton-Bush Haiti Fund. As Tom Hanks put it near the end of the night:

Mr. TOM HANKS (Actor): The phone line will remain open, the Web site will remain up, and you can purchase this amazing music on iTunes. Just keep going.

(Soundbite of song, "Bridge Over Troubled Waters")

Mr. WONDER: (Singing) ...when you're down and out, when youre on the street, when evening falls so hard...

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