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Vikings Lose: Minn. Farmer Still Not Shaving

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Vikings Lose: Minn. Farmer Still Not Shaving

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Vikings Lose: Minn. Farmer Still Not Shaving

Vikings Lose: Minn. Farmer Still Not Shaving

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In 1974, when the Minnesota Vikings lost the Super Bowl to the Pittsburgh Steelers, a Minnesota farmer vowed not to shave until they won. Thirty-six years later, Emmett Pearson is still waiting. His wife tells a local newspaper she was desperately hoping this would be the year. But the Vikings lost a playoff game Sunday to New Orleans in overtime.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. Im Steve Inskeep with condolences to Emmett Pearson.

In 1974, the Minnesota Vikings lost the Super Bowl and the Minnesota farmer vowed not to trim his beard until they won. Thirty-six years later, hes still waiting. A photo shows a white beard, not as long as you might think, but a little scraggly. His wife tells the Post-Bulletin newspaper she was desperately hoping this would be the year. But the Vikings lost a playoff game, yesterday, to New Orleans in overtime.

Its MORNING EDITION.

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