NPR logo

'As the World Burns': The Politics Of Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/123063248/123064543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'As the World Burns': The Politics Of Climate Change

Author Interviews

'As the World Burns': The Politics Of Climate Change

'As the World Burns': The Politics Of Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/123063248/123064543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Goodell's most recent book, Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America's Energy Future, considers the perils of coal dependency in America. Eric Etheridge hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Etheridge

Goodell's most recent book, Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America's Energy Future, considers the perils of coal dependency in America.

Eric Etheridge

The past few years have seen a shift from talking about global warming to watching it happen before our very eyes.

That's according to journalist Jeff Goodell, whose article "As the World Burns: How Big Oil and Big Coal mounted one of the most aggressive lobbying campaigns in history to block progress on global warming" was published in the January 2010 issue of Rolling Stone.

In his article, Goodell explains why — when the Obama administration's first moves to enact climate legislation seemed so promising — we have yet to see meaningful progress.

Goodell is a Rolling Stone contributing editor and author of the upcoming book How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth's Climate. He joins host Terry Gross for a conversation about the lobbying interests that have tried to block climate change legislation in the past and what they could mean for future environmental policy.