Frightened Rabbit: When Solitude Is Suicide

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As the title of "Swim Until You Can't See Land" suggests, Frightened Rabbit's pursuit of escape bears a whiff of self-destruction. Jannica Honey hide caption

itoggle caption Jannica Honey
Frightened Rabbit

As the title of "Swim Until You Can't See Land" suggests, Frightened Rabbit's pursuit of escape bears a whiff of self-destruction.

Jannica Honey

Wednesday's Pick

  • Song: "Swim Until You Can't See Land"
  • Artist: Frightened Rabbit
  • CD: The Winter of Mixed Drinks
  • Genre: Rock

The Scottish quintet Frightened Rabbit fits pretty neatly into a collection of majestically surly Scottish bands — The Twilight Sad, Glasvegas, We Were Promised Jetpacks and others — that sound as if they'd like to be left alone. So it's not exactly a great thematic reach for Frightened Rabbit to explore themes of solitude and alienation on The Winter of Mixed Drinks and its fine first single, "Swim Until You Can't See Land."

As the six-minute anthem's title suggests, singer-guitarist Scott Hutchison's pursuit of escape comes tinged with more than a whiff of self-destruction. For every allusion to the demons at his back — "Let's call me a Baptist / Call this the drowning of the past" — a grand chorus is there to hint at a less cleansing fate. Standing at the shoreline, pondering "the boredom that drove me here," Hutchison finds himself wedged between the dashed hopes of his past and a future where prospects are bleak. It's not called "Swim Until Your Legs Give Out," but it might as well be.

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Winter of Mixed Drinks

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Album
Winter of Mixed Drinks
Artist
Frightened Rabbit
Label
Fat Cat Records
Released
2010

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