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Toyota Investigates Corolla Steering Issues

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Toyota Investigates Corolla Steering Issues

Business

Toyota Investigates Corolla Steering Issues

Toyota Investigates Corolla Steering Issues

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The Japanese automaker is debating whether to recall its popular Corolla subcompact after reports of power steering problems. At the same time, Toyota's president says he won't testify to Congress about the company's safety problems. Instead, the company's top U.S. official will be there.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with the latest from Toyota.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: Toyota says it's looking into possible power steering problems in its Corollas. The Japanese automaker has already recalled more than eight million cars over the past few weeks. Most of those recalls involve gas pedals. Today, Toyota said all future models will have a break override system. It would cut engine power when the accelerator and break pedals are applied at the same time.

Toyota is still being scrutinized by U.S. lawmakers. However, the carmaker's CEO, Akio Toyoda, says he will not attend U.S. congressional hearings on the recall. Instead, the company's top U.S. official will deal with the grilling.

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