Photos: Haiti's Rainy Season

  • As if the Jan. 12 earthquake weren't devastating enough, Haiti now faces the rainy season, which usually begins in late spring. After heavy rains overnight Wednesday and Thursday, a girl jumps across a flooded field containing the sewage runoff from the Mais Gate tent city near the airport in Port-au-Prince.
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    As if the Jan. 12 earthquake weren't devastating enough, Haiti now faces the rainy season, which usually begins in late spring. After heavy rains overnight Wednesday and Thursday, a girl jumps across a flooded field containing the sewage runoff from the Mais Gate tent city near the airport in Port-au-Prince.
    David Gilkey/NPR/NPR
  • Margarette Brutus, 50, tries to clean a bedsheet soiled by the muddy waters that flooded her tent after heavy rains. Since the earthquake, her family has been divided, as she found more stable housing for her older children in different camps.
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    Margarette Brutus, 50, tries to clean a bedsheet soiled by the muddy waters that flooded her tent after heavy rains. Since the earthquake, her family has been divided, as she found more stable housing for her older children in different camps.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Margarette reaches out for help as she attempts to remove her belongings from her tent.
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    Margarette reaches out for help as she attempts to remove her belongings from her tent.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Ten-year-old Alex Mertulus stands in the mud in the Mais Gate tent city. He and his mother, Margarette Brutus, are fighting a losing battle as they try to find durable, dry housing.
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    Ten-year-old Alex Mertulus stands in the mud in the Mais Gate tent city. He and his mother, Margarette Brutus, are fighting a losing battle as they try to find durable, dry housing.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Families collect their belongings and begin moving out of their camp, flooded with waters containing sewage runoff. Aid organizations and government officials are scrambling to avoid a catastrophe when the rainy season intensifies.
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    Families collect their belongings and begin moving out of their camp, flooded with waters containing sewage runoff. Aid organizations and government officials are scrambling to avoid a catastrophe when the rainy season intensifies.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • A young boy plays in contaminated water outside a flooded tent in the Mais Gate tent city after heavy rains flooded the area in the middle of the night on Thursday. Quake survivors tried to stay dry and dig tents out of the mud, but they are already having to relocate to new camps.
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    A young boy plays in contaminated water outside a flooded tent in the Mais Gate tent city after heavy rains flooded the area in the middle of the night on Thursday. Quake survivors tried to stay dry and dig tents out of the mud, but they are already having to relocate to new camps.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • A Haitian man attempts to dig a trench in the mud to alleviate the flood damage. As the heavy rains begin, the question is no longer simply how to find housing for Haitians, but also how to keep them dry.
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    A Haitian man attempts to dig a trench in the mud to alleviate the flood damage. As the heavy rains begin, the question is no longer simply how to find housing for Haitians, but also how to keep them dry.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • In a futile effort, Alex Mertulus scoops water with a small bucket at the entrance of his tent. His mother, Margarette, lost her husband and home in the earthquake. This is the second time she and Alex have had to move among Haiti's tent camps because of  flooding.
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    In a futile effort, Alex Mertulus scoops water with a small bucket at the entrance of his tent. His mother, Margarette, lost her husband and home in the earthquake. This is the second time she and Alex have had to move among Haiti's tent camps because of flooding.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Margarette and Alex empty a bucket of dirty water into a drainage ditch.
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    Margarette and Alex empty a bucket of dirty water into a drainage ditch.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Margarette uses safety pins to hold up her makeshift roof. According to The Associated Press, approximately 1 million people are still homeless more than a month after the earthquake.
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    Margarette uses safety pins to hold up her makeshift roof. According to The Associated Press, approximately 1 million people are still homeless more than a month after the earthquake.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Alex remains with his mother as they attempt to survive amid the earthquake's wreckage and, like other Haitians, take things one day at a time.
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    Alex remains with his mother as they attempt to survive amid the earthquake's wreckage and, like other Haitians, take things one day at a time.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR

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