Treasury Secretary Geithner Gets 'Vogue' Spread

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Apparently the financial crisis is over. Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner is being featured in an upcoming issue of fashion magazine Vouge. Politico got an advanced look at the article. It reports Geithner is described as having "the kind of looks that can go either way: Half an inch one way he's John F. Kennedy; half an inch the other he's Lyle Lovett."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And our last word in business is the man with two faces. The Wall Street Journal reports Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner faces criticism in Congress despite efforts to rescue the economy. He is criticized for his perceived closeness to big banks.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

The satirical newspaper The Onion ran the headline: Geithner Refuses to Come Down Off Capitol Dome. It pictured the Treasury secretary sitting up there in protest shouting: You all hate me.

INSKEEP: That was a made up news story, but this is real. Even though he's out of fashion, the Treasury secretary is in the style magazine Vogue. He is profiled in the upcoming issue.

MONTAGNE: The magazine's writer describes Geithner as, quote, "having the kind of looks that can go either way."

INSKEEP: Half an inch one way, he's John F. Kennedy. Half an inch the other, he's Lyle Lovett.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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