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Environment

Iceberg Threatens 'March Of Penguins' Colony

A 60-mile-long iceberg known as B9B, right, crashes into the Mertz Glacier Tongue, left, in the Australian Antarctic Territory on Saturday. The collision created a new 48-mile-long iceberg. AP Photo/Commonwealth of Australia hide caption

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AP Photo/Commonwealth of Australia

A 60-mile-long iceberg known as B9B, right, crashes into the Mertz Glacier Tongue, left, in the Australian Antarctic Territory on Saturday. The collision created a new 48-mile-long iceberg.

AP Photo/Commonwealth of Australia

An enormous iceberg in Antarctica plowed into a peninsula made of ice and snapped it off, creating a second gigantic iceberg, and threatening the penguin colony made famous by the movie March of the Penguins.

The Mertz glacier in Antarctica has been gradually oozing out to sea, and for the past 70 years, it has been producing a giant tongue of ice.

French and Australian scientists have been watching that tongue because it looked like it would eventually crack off and become a giant iceberg. That's exactly what happened about a week ago, when a 60-mile-long iceberg rammed into it.

The two icebergs are now gradually heading counterclockwise around Antarctica, south of Australia. They're moving toward an area of open water that's the feeding grounds for the Emperor penguins who became international stars in the March of the Penguins documentary.

Biologists say this could make life even tougher for these amazingly hardy birds.

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