In Your Ear: Los Amigos Invisibles

Grammy Award-winning Venezuelan rock group Los Amigos Invisibles shares stories of the music that inspires them for Tell Me More’s occasional series, In Your Ear.

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LYNN NEARY, host:

The Latin alternative group Los Amigos Invisibles call Brooklyn their home, but Venezuela is their homeland. Last year, the country erupted in pride when the band won a Latin Grammy for their album "Commercial." The group has a wide range of influences, from rock to funk to acid jazz.

To get a better sense of what inspires them, lead guitarist Cheo shared whats currently topping his playlist for our segment In Your Ear.

(Soundbite of music)

Mr. JOSE LUIS PARDO (Lead Guitarist, Los Amigos Invisibles): Hello, my name is Jose Luis, Cheo, from Los Amigos Invisibles and right now, Im really hooked in a old song called Lovely Day from Bill Withers.

(Soundbite of song, Lovely Day)

Mr. BILL WITHERS (Musician): (Singing) Just one look at you and I know its gonna be - a lovely day - lovely day, lovely day, lovely day, lovely day. Lovely day, lovely day, lovely day, lovely day. A lovely day - lovely day...

Mr. PARDO: I went to see Still Bill. Its a movie that they did about him and I went to see him and he was there, doing a Q and A and it was such a great experience. Im really in love with his music now and this song has been like with me (unintelligible).

(Soundbite of song, Lovely Day)

Mr. WITHERS: (Singing) lovely day, lovely day, lovely day, lovely day, lovely day, lovely day, lovely day. A lovely day - lovely day...

Mr. PARDO: Then, Im really hooked in Mayer Hawthorne, in Just Aint Gonna Work Out.

(Soundbite of song, Just Ain't Gonna Work Out)

Mr. MAYER HAWTHORNE (Musician): (Singing) Baby it will be ok, and I dont wanna see you cry darling...

Mr. PARDO: Im really happy that, you know, such a soulful musician is doing so well and is getting a lot of attention because its a great record.

(Soundbite of song, Just Ain't Gonna Work Out)

Mr. HAWTHORNE: (Singing) but it just aint working out. Im sorry, it just aint gonna work out, just aint gonna work out girl. Im sorry, it just aint gonna work out, just aint gonna work out girl.

(Soundbite of song, El Tigeraso)

Ms. NATALIE YEPEZ (Singer): (Singing in foreign language)

Mr. PARDO: And also I have to give my respect to Maluca.

(Soundbite of song, El Tigeraso)

Ms. YEPEZ: (Singing in foreign language)

Mr. PARDO: She's produced by Diplo and she made like a they made like an amazing track called El Tigeraso.

(Soundbite of song, El Tigeraso)

Ms. YEPEZ: (Singing) I went around your way, I went around your way. I went to 182nd and autobahn(ph) just the other day...

Mr. PARDO: Its like part of the new Dominican electro theme.

(Soundbite of song, El Tigeraso)

Ms. YEPEZ: (Singing) El tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso, el tigeraso...

MARTIN: That was Jose Luis Pardo, better known as Cheo. He plays lead guitar for the Latin alternative band Los Amigos Invisibles. Well be airing a performance by the group from our studios here in Washington later this month.

And thats our program for today.

Im Lynn Neary in for Michel Martin. This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Lets talk more tomorrow.

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