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Manure Tea: Not Fit For Human Consumption

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Manure Tea: Not Fit For Human Consumption

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Manure Tea: Not Fit For Human Consumption

Manure Tea: Not Fit For Human Consumption

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Annie Haven's family has been ranching in Southern California for a hundred years but a prolonged drought has left her with too few cattle to make a living. So she's turned to selling manure tea bags. She says straight manure is too strong for flowers but a nice manure tea helps them grow. She tells The Orange County Register, "I'm growing my green business in this brown economy."

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Annie Haven's family has been ranching in Southern California for a hundred years, but a prolonged drought has left her with too few cattle to make a living. So she turned to selling manure tea bags. She says straight manure is too strong for flowers, but a nice manure tea hits the spot. She told the Orange County Register she got the idea from her grandmother. By the way, the bags are bigger than normal, so you won't confuse them with your Earl Grey.

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