Family Sues Toyota Over High-Speed Crash

Back in August, a Lexus began to accelerate on a Southern California freeway. It reached speeds of more than 120 mph. The accelerator was stuck. And in the seconds before it crashed, a recording captured the emergency call for help from the people inside. Relatives of the people killed have filed suit against Toyota.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with a lawsuit against Toyota.

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INSKEEP: Back in August, a Lexus, a luxury car made by Toyota, began to accelerate. It reached 120 miles per hour. The accelerator was stuck. And in the seconds before it crashed, a 911 recording captured the call for help of the people inside.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Now, the relatives of the family that was killed have filed suit. They're alleging product liability and negligence. The suit targets the dealer as well.

INSKEEP: At the same time, federal officials say the number of deaths linked to sudden acceleration in Toyotas is rising. And the Los Angeles Times reports that some Toyota owners complain their vehicles are still accelerating suddenly, even after dealerships made repairs to fix the problem.

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