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Hotline Allows Confessions To Be Phoned In

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Hotline Allows Confessions To Be Phoned In

Business

Hotline Allows Confessions To Be Phoned In

Hotline Allows Confessions To Be Phoned In

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  • Transcript

Right before Lent, a French company set up an automated telephone line that allows Catholics to confess over the phone. In case of mortal sins, the phone voice does say, there is no replacement for confiding to a priest. French bishops say the church does not approve of "Line to the Lord."

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today: confessez-vous.

(Soundbite of music)

Unidentified Man: (French spoken)

MONTAGNE: Just in time for Lent, a French company has set up an automated phone hotline. For about 45 cents a minute, French Catholics can skip church and confess over the phone to the Line of the Lord. Press one for advice on your confession, two to confess. But...

Unidentified Man: (French spoken)

MONTAGNE: In the case of mortal sins, the phone voice does say there's no replacement for confiding to a priest. No kidding. The Conference of French Bishops says the service has no approval from the Catholic Church. Ca ne fait rien.

The Line to the Lord did receive 300 calls in its first week.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Dont you mean Renee Montagne?

MONTAGNE: I mean Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: There we go. And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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