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Summer: Time for a Snooze, Not the News
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Summer: Time for a Snooze, Not the News

Summer: Time for a Snooze, Not the News

Summer: Time for a Snooze, Not the News
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Some people simply must slow down when the weather gets hot. But maybe the people on TV don't have summer. They can't seem to stop working. The rest of us can just pretend its Sunday all summer long.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Commentator Andrei Codrescu is taking his summer break and he's been thinking about the joy of summer slowing down, way down.

ANDREI CODRESCU: Summer is here, and there are kids tumbling and leaping over carpets and over sofas. Outside, the sugar-water bird feeder, the hummingbirds, rumble. The seed feeder, the Golden Finches are in a serious dispute with an insane squirrel.

Dave Brinks says that he was reading a bedtime story to his daughter, Mina(ph), who stopped him to ask, what's a forehead, Daddy? Dave explained. Mina thought about it, then said, Daddy, you don't have four heads. Concluded Brinks, I needed that. Sure enough, we all do. It's summer and it's time to remember that you don't have four heads. In fact, you don't even have one. What you have is a gas balloon filled with vague thoughts and a few things you don't feel like doing, hanging the hammock, picking up the book, turning off the TV, chasing away the squirrel.

In the winter, when you have four heads, you could do all these things and more, but those heads fell off one by one as winter turned into spring, and spring into summer. You'll grow another head in the fall when school starts. It will be small at first then it'll swell with all kinds of important ideas. It will notice the state of the world. It will want to do something. It will watch the news.

We saw Angelina Jolie on the news saying that she wants to adopt a million babies. Where does she get her energy? It's summer. Maybe the people you see on TV have only one season, work or winter. Maybe people on TV don't have summer because they work like ants all year so the grasshoppers, like us, can have summer.

I'm only saying these things because it's Sunday. Tomorrow is Monday, and I'm going to pretend that it's Sunday. I'm going to do that all summer. I'd only have to do something about that squirrel. It's gone way past fighting for seeds. It's become sadistic. Here's a nice rock.

BLOCK: Andrei Codrescu summers in the mountains of Northern Arkansas.

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