Rubik's Cube Still Confounds At 30

It has been 30 years since one of the world's great puzzles came to this country. The multicolored device was called the Magic Cube when it first went on sale in a Budapest toyshop. But by 1980, the puzzle carried the name of its inventor, Hungarian architecture professor Erno Rubik. Host Liane Hansen takes a moment to note the toy's anniversary.

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Thirty years ago, one of the world's great puzzles came to this country. The multicolored device was called the Magic Cube when it first went on sale in a Budapest toyshop. But in 1980, once the Ideal Toy Corporation started importing it to the United States, the puzzle carried the name of its inventor, Hungarian architecture professor Erno Rubik.

The professor was actually more interested in solving a structural design problem than creating a puzzle when he developed the Rubik's Cube. And once he started fidgeting with it, he feared he would never again be able to get all of the colors to properly align themselves. He did though, after a month of twisting.

Since those early experimental days, more than 350 million Rubik's Cubes have been sold planet-wide. And according to the official Rubiks Web site, Erno Rubik is comfortably enjoying his retirement.

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