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India Turns To 'Ghost Pepper' To Fight Terrorism

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India Turns To 'Ghost Pepper' To Fight Terrorism

India Turns To 'Ghost Pepper' To Fight Terrorism

India Turns To 'Ghost Pepper' To Fight Terrorism

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In India, the world's hottest chili is not just for curry, it's also for fighting terrorism. The indian military used it for a substance similar to tear gas. They say the pungent smell will immobilize suspected terrorists. The so-called ghost pepper packs a powerful punch: 100 times hotter than the spiciest jalapeno.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

In India, the world's hottest chili is not just for curry, it's for fighting terrorism. The Indian military planned to use it for a substance similar to tear gas. They say the pungent smell will immobilize suspected terrorists. The so-called ghost pepper packs a powerful punch: 100 times hotter than the spiciest jalapeno. It can also cure stomach ailments and keep wild elephants at bay.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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