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Three-Minute Fiction: Round 4 Has Begun

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Three-Minute Fiction: Round 4 Has Begun

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 4 Has Begun

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 4 Has Begun

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/125282300/125282308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Host Guy Raz reminds listeners that the fourth round of Three Minute fiction has begun. For this round, novelist Ann Patchett will judge your original short stories. And remember, each story has to include four little words: plant, button, trick and fly.

GUY RAZ, host:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

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RAZ: And a quick reminder that Round Four of our Three-Minute Fiction contest is now open. Here's our judge. You might be familiar with her novels, "Run" and "Bel Canto."

Ms. ANN PATCHETT (Author): I'm Ann Patchett, and I want you to write me a story using these four, simple words: trick, button, plant and fly. You can use them any way you want, as nouns, adjectives, verbs. If you use them as verbs, you can use them in any tense.

The only thing is there is a deadline. So you have to get your stories in by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, April 11th. Good luck.

RAZ: Remember, we have to be able to read your story in under three minutes, so no more than 600 words. To see the full rules and to submit your story, go to our Web site, npr.org/threeminutefiction, and that's threeminutefiction, all spelled out, no spaces.

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