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Helicopter Company Speeds N.Y. Commuters

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Helicopter Company Speeds N.Y. Commuters

Business

Helicopter Company Speeds N.Y. Commuters

Helicopter Company Speeds N.Y. Commuters

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During the financial crisis, traveling by helicopter dropped sharply. Liberty Helicopters is launching a commuter service from New Jersey to New York. For $100 one way, busy commuters can avoid tiresome traffic on the ground, and instead zip over the vehicles to and from work.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And for those who still have a job in banking, there are some indications the industry is on the rise. Salaries and bonuses have gone up. Also making a comeback: helicopter commuting. Our last word in business today is up in the air.

Helicopter travel never disappeared, but it dropped sharply during the financial crises. This weekend, however, Liberty Helicopters launched a commuter service from New Jersey to New York. Busy executives can avoid tiresome traffic on the ground and, instead, zip over the Statue of Liberty to and from work.

Liberty Helicopters normally runs charter flights. Then, an executive there said, he started the high-flying taxi service after getting requests from Wall Street traders and other executives. And the fare, one-way, is $100.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

And I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

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