Business

'Motherhood' Flops At The British Box Office

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The movie Motherhood starring Uma Thurman came out last October. It's the story of a stressed-out Manhattan mom. In the U.S., the film didn't even gross $100,000. When the movie opened in Great Britain recently, only a dozen people showed up at the one theater where it was showing.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today: mother of all flops.

A movie starring Uma Thurman came out last fall. It's called "Motherhood" and it's the story of a stressed-out Manhattan mom.

(Soundbite of movie, "Motherhood")

Unidentified Woman (Actor): (as character) Oh wow, youre a stay-at-home mom? Nobody in this city would admit to that.

MONTAGNE: No matter that the movie's cast is well-known; you likely never saw it, maybe never even heard of it. The film grossed a pathetic $50,000 at the box office. But it gets worse.

(Soundbite of movie, "Motherhood")

Ms. UMA THURMAN (Actor): (as Eliza Welsh) Motherhood is about accepting things that you can't control.

MONTAGNE: And one thing that the producers of the movie couldnt control - when the movie opened in Great Britain, recently, only a dozen people showed up at the one theater where it was showing. On the Sunday of its debut weekend, The Guardian newspaper reports that the box office pulled in $12. That means one person bought a ticket for the movie.

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