Foreign Policy: The World's Strangest Tax Laws

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A person watching a webcam i

A person looking at webcam pictures. Last year, the Skatteverket began cracking down on hundreds of online webcam strippers who had neglected to pay income taxes on money received for their services. Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images
A person watching a webcam

A person looking at webcam pictures. Last year, the Skatteverket began cracking down on hundreds of online webcam strippers who had neglected to pay income taxes on money received for their services.

Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images

Webcam Stripper Tax

Country: Sweden

Who's affected: Online pornographers

The bottom line: The Swedish tax authority has apparently never heard of the phrase "not safe for work." Last year, the Skatteverket began cracking down on hundreds of online webcam strippers who had neglected to pay income taxes on money received for their services. Dag Hardyson, head of the investigation, told the BBC that initially the agency had difficulty identifying some of the strippers and that automated software failed to adequately target the culprits, but, "When we investigated the sites manually, it worked better."

The Skatteverket estimates the lost revenue to be north of 40 million Swedish kronor ($5.56 million). Hardyson's explanation probably raises more questions than it answers: "They are young girls, we can see from the photos. We think that perhaps they are not well informed about the rules." Creepy.

For more strange taxes and exemptions throughout the world, look here.

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