Somali Radio Stations Threatened By Insurgents

This week, The New York Times reported that at least 14 radio stations in Mogadishu have stopped broadcasting music because local insurgents warned that music — any music — is "un-Islamic." Broadcasters have been scrambling to find sound — almost any sound — to replace tunes.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

New York Times reported this week that at least 14 radio stations in Mogadishu have stopped broadcasting music because local insurgents warned that music any music is un-Islamic. How do you run a radio station without any music? Even the car guys play a little music.

Osman Abdullahi Gure, the director of Mogadishu's Radio Shabelle, told the Times: We have replaced the music of the early morning program with the sound of the rooster, replaced the news music with the sound of the firing bullet, and the music of the night program with the sound of running horses.

Well, maybe that format will catch on. Do they have any pledge drives?

(Soundbite of recording)

Unidentified People: (Singing) Good morning. Good morning. Good.

(Soundbite of rooster)

Unidentified People: (Singing) Good morning. Good morning. Good.

(Soundbite of birds chirping)

Unidentified People: (Singing) Good morning. Good morning. Good.

(Soundbite of cat)

Good morning. Good morning. Good.

(Soundbite of dogs barking)

Unidentified People: (Singing) Good morning. Good morning. Good.

(Soundbite of horses)

Unidentified People: (Singing) Good morning. Good morning. Good.

(Soundbite of growling)

SIMON: Youre listening to NPR News.

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