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'Arkansas Sound' by Arkansas Bo

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Arkansas Bo: You Say You're From Where?

Arkansas Bo: You Say You're From Where?

'Arkansas Sound' by Arkansas Bo

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Arkansas Bo i

In "Arkansas Sound," the rapper Arkansas Bo does what he can to put his home state on the hip-hop map. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Arkansas Bo

In "Arkansas Sound," the rapper Arkansas Bo does what he can to put his home state on the hip-hop map.

courtesy of the artist

Wednesday's Pick

  • Artist: Arkansas Bo
  • Song: "Arkansas Sound"
  • CD: The Notebook mixtape
  • Genre: Hip-Hop

Arkansas Bo is Marlon Jennings, a member of the duo Suga City and one of the South's best little-known rappers. Though he possesses a smooth flow and specializes in funny punch lines, he has yet to get his due. This might have something to do with the state from which he hails. As he notes in "Arkansas Sound," just about every other part of the South has gotten its national hip-hop props, including Georgia (home to OutKast), Tennessee (Three 6 Mafia), Louisiana (Lil Wayne) and Mississippi (David Banner). "Why we the ones that everybody fail to mention / and my state lies smack-dab underneath the Mason-Dixon?"

Jennings was raised in Stuttgart, Ark., and though he now lives in Dallas, he's made it his mission to win respect for his birthplace. And so in "Arkansas Sound," from his mixtape The Notebook, he addresses a question he's often asked: What does Arkansas rap sound like? "I don't know," he responds, "but I sound like this." Over a beat that employs thick bass and braying guitar (and feels sampled from a '70s acid-rock track), he addresses Little Rock's reputation for gangs and pays homage to the state's attractive women. "I'm so cold I threw the state on the front of my name," he notes. "If you don't like it, looky here: You ain't gotta listen."

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