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New $100 Bill Intended To Thwart Counterfeiters

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New $100 Bill Intended To Thwart Counterfeiters

Business

New $100 Bill Intended To Thwart Counterfeiters

New $100 Bill Intended To Thwart Counterfeiters

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/126183581/126183601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Officials at the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department introduced a new $100 note Wednesday. It's redesigned to countdown on counterfeits. The bills go into circulation in 2011.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And today's last word in business is the new Ben.

Yesterday, the government introduced a new $100 bill. It's redesigned to thwart counterfeiters, most of whom are overseas, which is where most American $100 bills are in circulation. The new notes will look pretty much the same. Ben Franklin is still on the front. There's still a watermark and security strip visible when held to the light.

But if you turn the bill over, you will not see the front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Instead, you'll see the back. Tricky. And there's a 3D panel with images of bells that change to the number 100 when tilted. You don't even need 3D glasses to see it.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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