Ariz. Governor Signs Strict Immigration Bill

Hundreds of protesters rally to protest immigration bill. i i

hide captionHundreds of protesters rally at the Capitol to protest the possible signing of immigration bill SB1070 by Gov. Jan Brewer Friday, April 23, 2010, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP
Hundreds of protesters rally to protest immigration bill.

Hundreds of protesters rally at the Capitol to protest the possible signing of immigration bill SB1070 by Gov. Jan Brewer Friday, April 23, 2010, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law Friday a tough immigration bill that President Obama criticized as "misguided."

The sweeping measure, sent to the Republican governor by the GOP-led Legislature, would make it a crime under state law to be in the country illegally. It would also require local police officers to question people about their immigration status if there is reason to suspect they are illegal immigrants.

Brewer said the law "protects every Arizona citizen."

"We in Arizona have been more than patient waiting for Washington to act," she said after signing the law. "But decades of inaction and misguided policy have created a dangerous and unacceptable situation."

The bill takes effect in 90 days after the current legislative session ends.

Earlier, while renewing his call for a "comprehensive" overhaul of the nation's immigration laws, Obama criticized the Arizona measure, calling it "misguided." He directed the Justice Department to be on the lookout for possible civil rights violations. He said similar reactions were likely elsewhere until the federal government moved forward with both border security and a path to legalization for millions of undocumented residents.

"Indeed, our failure to act responsibly at the federal level will only open the door to irresponsibility by others," Obama said.

The president made the comments during a Rose Garden ceremony for two dozen new Americans, whose citizenship was fast-tracked by their military service.

Civil rights activists have said the Arizona bill would lead to racial profiling and deter Hispanics from reporting crimes. Hundreds of Hispanics protested the legislation at the state capitol complex on Thursday.

The bill's sponsor, Republican Sen. Russell Pearce of Mesa, said it would remove "political handcuffs" from police and help drive illegal immigrants from the state.

"Illegal is illegal," said Pearce, a driving force on the issue in Arizona. "We'll have less crime. We'll have lower taxes. We'll have safer neighborhoods. We'll have shorter lines in the emergency rooms. We'll have smaller classrooms."

Arizona has an estimated 460,000 illegal immigrants and is the nation's busiest border crossing point, with the harsh, remote desert serving as the illegal gateway for thousands of Mexicans and Central Americans.

Other provisions of the bill allow lawsuits against government agencies that hinder enforcement of immigration laws, and make it illegal to hire illegal immigrants for day labor or knowingly transport them.

The bill would take effect 90 days after the current legislative session ends if it becomes law.

Brewer faces a contested Aug. 24 Republican primary election, and one of her opponents, state Treasurer Dean Martin, has called on her to sign the legislation.

Also, the March 27 shooting death of rancher Bob Krentz on his property in southeastern Arizona has brought illegal immigration and border security into greater focus in the state. Authorities believe Krentz was killed by an illegal border crosser.

Since the shooting, Brewer and other officeholders and candidates have toured the state's border with Mexico. On Thursday, she ordered a reallocation of state National Guard and law enforcement resources and called on the federal government to deploy National Guard troops.

Arizona has previously passed a variety of get-tough measures dealing with illegal immigration.

Brewer's predecessor, Janet Napolitano, a Democrat who is now Obama's homeland security secretary, vetoed similar proposals. But she signed a 2007 law that imposes sanctions against employers who knowingly hire illegal immigrants. Other state laws make human smuggling a state crime and restrict illegal immigrants' eligibility for public services.

The Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund said the bill before Brewer is unconstitutional because regulation of immigration is a federal responsibility.

Others urging Brewer to veto the bill include Catholic bishops, New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, a Democrat, and Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard, the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee for governor. Mexico's embassy also has voiced concerns about racial profiling.

A Phoenix Law Enforcement Association representative acknowledged that racial profiling can occur but said fears associated with the bill are unfounded.

"We're not targeting any particular group," said Levi Bolton, a retired police detective. "Cops are not here to do these things to you."

NPR's Scott Horsley contributed to this report, which also includes material from The Associated Press

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: