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A Final Farewell To Dorothy Height
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A Final Farewell To Dorothy Height

Remembrances

A Final Farewell To Dorothy Height

A Final Farewell To Dorothy Height
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Dignitaries including President Obama paid tribute to late civil rights icon Dorothy Height today at the National Cathedral. It’s one of several services this week honoring Height. Tell Me More brings listeners the voices of many ordinary people who gathered at Washington’s Shiloh Baptist church yesterday to pay tribute to Height.

MICHEL MARTIN, host:

Finally today, more tributes to the late Dorothy Height, community organizer, author, mentor, feminist, human rights activist. Shes known affectionately as the godmother of Civil Rights Movement, a long-time leader of the National Council of Negro Women.

Height died last week at the age of 98. This week, the nation is remembering her life and work. President Obama delivered her eulogy at the National Cathedral today.

President BARACK OBAMA: The love in this sanctuary is a testament to a life lived righteously.

MARTIN: Yesterday, dignitaries and ordinary people alike gathered for a community remembrance at the Shiloh Baptist Church here in Washington, D.C. We went there to hear from some of those who came to pay their respects and here are some of their stories.

RUTH: I'm Ruth and I'm from Washington, D.C. In fact, I'm a Washingtonian about four generations. And for me, she really means as a black woman never giving up, no matter what happens. No matter what happens. I think I actually met Dr. Height on the bus one Sunday. I was taking my small boys to Sunday school and she stopped and talked to me and told me who she was and everything and how she liked the fact that I was taking my boys to Sunday school no matter what.

Mr. HERMAN EDWARDS: Yes, my name is Herman Edwards. I'm a member of 100 Black Men of the Greater Washington, D.C. Its very refreshing that, you know, she looked out for everyone, all the types of minorities, women as well as black men, too, and I think that was a really big thing. She didnt get a lot of credit for that. She did not. But I'm sure now that she's gone she probably will get a lot of credit.

Ms. KAREN MILLER. I'm Karen Miller. Originally, I'm a native from Philadelphia. I'm currently in Washington, D.C. area working on my PhD in social work. I, too, am trying to fight for the underserved and underprivileged. She inspired me to do that.

Mr. THEODORE SMITH: My name is Theodore Smith. I'm 12 years old and from Lanham, Maryland. The reason I'm here is because my mom actually met Dorothy Height once and she wanted to pay her respects.

Ms. TINA SMITH: I'm Tina Smith. I'm his mother. We needed to remember her, because she was a very strong and educated black woman who did not sit down for anyone. Even though she has passed, you always look forward because she is your future and he is the future.

MARTIN: These are some of the voices of people remembering Dorothy Height at a service yesterday at Washingtons Shiloh Baptist Church.

And that's our program for today. Im Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Lets talk more tomorrow.

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