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Square Watermelons Invade New York

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Square Watermelons Invade New York

Business

Square Watermelons Invade New York

Square Watermelons Invade New York

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/126408369/126408340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A fruit company in Panama has sent its first shipment of 120 square watermelons to New York. A company official says the melons are not genetically modified. Instead, they're grown inside cube-shaped glass boxes. They'll cost about $75.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is about a niche product. It fits into a square niche, because our last word is square watermelons. They've been known as expensive gifts in Japan, but a fruit company in Panama just sent its first shipment of square watermelons to New York. A company official says the melons are not genetically modified. They're just grown inside cube-shaped, glass box. And as they grow, they fit the mold.

Square watermelons cost about $75, though if they catch on and production goes up, the price might come down. And who knows? Maybe one day square watermelons will be common summer fare, stacked up on July 4th barbecue tables. They'll also fit better in the fridge.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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