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Smashed Laptop Part Of Professor's Stunt

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Smashed Laptop Part Of Professor's Stunt

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Smashed Laptop Part Of Professor's Stunt

Smashed Laptop Part Of Professor's Stunt

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Last week, we reported on a backlash in college classrooms over the use of laptop computers. Our report included a scene from one classroom where Professor Kieran Mullen of the University of Oklahoma smashed a student's computer. Host Scott Simon shares a letter from Mullen, who says, "You neglected to mention that the incident was entirely staged."

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Last week we reported on a backlash in college classrooms over the use of laptop computers. Our report included this scene from one classroom.

(Soundbite of smashing and gasps)

Professor KIERAN MULLEN (University of Oklahoma): Don't bring laptops and work on them in class. Have I made my point clear?

SIMON: That was Professor Kieran Mullen of the University of Oklahoma. And he told us: You neglected to mention that the incident was entirely staged. No unwilling student's laptop was harmed.

Professor Mullen says that laptops in the classroom are part of what he called the evolution of electronic etiquette. He writes: Five years ago, cell phones might commonly go off in class. Students who routinely multitask at home are learning what is acceptable behavior in the classroom. Society will sort this all out in time.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: Multitask while you listen to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News.

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