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Nashville's Musical Legacy Under Water

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Nashville's Musical Legacy Under Water

Nashville's Musical Legacy Under Water

Nashville's Musical Legacy Under Water

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This week's flooding in Nashville has destroyed many homes, and many of the instruments that give Music Row its voice. The stage of the Grand Ole Opry is saturated with two feet of water. The basement of Soundcheck, where a lot of performers rehearse and store their gear, is under water. Glaser Instruments, a famous guitar and repair shop, was flooded, drowning many guitars that you might recognize in the arms of famous performers.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This week's flooding in Nashville has destroyed many homes - and many of the instruments that give Music Row its voice. The stage of the Grand Ole Opry is saturated with two feet of water. The basement of Soundcheck, where a lot of performers rehearse and store their gear, is under water. Glaser Instruments, a famous guitar and repair shop, was flooded, drowning many guitars you might recognize in the arms of famous performers. Joe Glaser says these are the instruments that Nashville history was made on. The benefit concerts are breaking out all over town, from the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, which is playing benefits outdoors, and the Grand Ole Opry, which found a dry stage downtown. It's time to rally, said Brad Paisley just before he went on last night; a performance in the Opry now is more important than the first time I ever played.

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