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In Your Ear: Jazz Violinist Regina Carter

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In Your Ear: Jazz Violinist Regina Carter

Music

In Your Ear: Jazz Violinist Regina Carter

In Your Ear: Jazz Violinist Regina Carter

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Renowned jazz violinist Regina Carter stops by the Tell Me More studios to talk about the music that's currently been inspiring her. Her picks a ragtime version of Praeludium and Allegro, Holly Hoffman's song "Sweet Andy" and Habib Koite's "Nta Dima."

ALLISON KEYES, host:

Now it's time for a segment we like to call In Your Ear. This is where we talk with people who swing by the NPR studios and ask them what music is currently inspiring them.

Today we hear from fabulous jazz violinist Regina Carter.

Ms. REGINA CARTER (Jazz Violinist): Hi, my name is Regina Carter and I've chosen a couple of tunes here that I've been listening to, or some of my all-time favorites. The first one is a piece that was originally written by Fritz Kreisler entitled "Praeludium and Allegro." But the recording of it is almost like a bebop piece.

(Soundbite of song, "Praeludium and Allegro")

Ms. CARTER: The reason I was really drawn to this recording, I played this piece in high school. This was part of my classical repertoire. But it was so cool when I heard it. It made the hairs on my arm stand up.

(Soundbite of song, "Praeludium and Allegro")

Ms. CARTER: I new approach to some Fritz Kreisler.

(Soundbite of song, "Praeludium and Allegro")

Ms. CARTER: The next piece is from a brand new CD from Holly Hoffman. The CD is called "Three's Company."

(Soundbite of song, "Sweet Andy")

Ms. CARTER: There's a piece on there called "Sweet Andy." It's with Holly on flute, piano and drums. There's no bass. And there's a lot of interplay between, especially, the flute and the drums.

(Soundbite of song, "Sweet Andy")

Ms. CARTER: What was so attractive to me about this piece is not having the bass there. You feel like you're on edge because, you know, so, like, there's an instrument that's laying down a line that holds it together. There's a lot of space, there's a lot of syncopation. So it makes you lean forward in your chair when you hear it, but the interplay between the instruments is really dynamic. And Holly Hoffman is one of my favorite musicians. She's a great flute player. So, I think this is a great record.

(Soundbite of song, "Sweet Andy")

Ms. CARTER: My next selection is by a singer/composer from Mali. His name is´┐ŻHabib Koite. And I can't pronounce this, I looked up the translation. It said that I will not give her to you. But this tune is just, when you first hear it, you can't figure out what time signature it's in, but when you hear it, it just, it's one of these pieces that just reached down into the depths of soul and just made me want to get up and move.

(Soundbite of song, "Nta Dima")

Ms. CARTER: And I listened to it over and over and over again. It just it's almost like a trance, puts me in a trance state or another type of relaxed state or just helps to wipe away all my stress. And I love Habib's voice. I think he's just got a very incredibly beautiful voice.

(Soundbite of song, "Nta Dima")

Mr. HABIB KOITE (Musician): (Singing in foreign language)

KEYES: That was jazz violinist Regina Carter telling us about the music that's playing in her ear. If you'd like to hear some of Regina's music, you can check out her new album titled "Reverse Thread," which will be available in stores on Tuesday.

(Soundbite of song, "Nta Dima")

Mr. HABIB KOITE (Musician): (Singing in foreign language)

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