Volcanic Ash Still Causing Flight Problems

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Airline passengers in northern Europe face more hassles because of volcano ash from Iceland. About 1,000 flights were grounded Monday, and hundreds of thousands of passengers were delayed. Britain's two biggest airports have reopened after being shut down overnight due to fears that a drifting cloud of ash could damage jet engines.

LYNN NEARY, host:

NPR's business news starts with volcanic ash disrupting more flights.

(Soundbite of music)

NEARY: Airline passengers in northern Europe are facing more hassles because of volcano ash from Iceland. A thousand flights were grounded today, and hundreds of thousands of passengers were delayed. Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, one of Europe's major airlines hubs, remains closed. Britain's two biggest airports have reopened after being shut down overnight due to fears that a drifting cloud of ash could damage jet engines.

Despite the reopening, passengers are being told to expect delays and cancellations. And tomorrow, British Airways cabin crews plan to strike in a long-running dispute over pay and working practices. Their union and British Airways managers were holding last-minute talks in London to avert the strike.

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