Photo Gallery: Wagah Border Ceremony

  • Pakistani rangers (in black) goosestep in front of Indian military border guards at Wagah, the only India-Pakistan border crossing. The flag-lowering ceremony, which is held at sunset every day, is an opportunity for the tensions between Pakistan and India to be ritualized.
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    Pakistani rangers (in black) goosestep in front of Indian military border guards at Wagah, the only India-Pakistan border crossing. The flag-lowering ceremony, which is held at sunset every day, is an opportunity for the tensions between Pakistan and India to be ritualized.
    John Poole/NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • The Pakistanis wear salwar kameez while the Indian officers wear khaki uniforms.
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    The Pakistanis wear salwar kameez while the Indian officers wear khaki uniforms.
    John Poole/NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • The 30-minute ceremony is a choreographed show of force, drumming and fanfare. Pakistani spectators shout "Pakistan!" and "Zindabad!" or "long live Pakistan."
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    The 30-minute ceremony is a choreographed show of force, drumming and fanfare. Pakistani spectators shout "Pakistan!" and "Zindabad!" or "long live Pakistan."
    John Poole/NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • A Pakistani ranger shakes hands with his Indian counterpart at the culmination of the ceremony.
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    A Pakistani ranger shakes hands with his Indian counterpart at the culmination of the ceremony.
    John Poole/NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • Women and men have different entrances into the Wagah ceremony on the Indian side of the border.
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    Women and men have different entrances into the Wagah ceremony on the Indian side of the border.
    Kainaz Amaria for NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • On the Indian side of the border, a woman cheers.  Spectators on both sides of the border try to outdo one another's enthusiasm.
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    On the Indian side of the border, a woman cheers. Spectators on both sides of the border try to outdo one another's enthusiasm.
    Kainaz Amaria for NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • Indian women greet each other.  During the ceremony, women and men sit on separate sides.
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    Indian women greet each other. During the ceremony, women and men sit on separate sides.
    Kainaz Amaria for NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR
  • A woman walks by the border fence. The gates at Wagah close nightly, resealing the Radcliffe Line that has separated India and Pakistan since 1947.
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    A woman walks by the border fence. The gates at Wagah close nightly, resealing the Radcliffe Line that has separated India and Pakistan since 1947.
    Kainaz Amaria for NPR/Kainaz Amaria for NPR and John Poole for NPR

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