No Sign of Miners, But Air in Collapsed Shaft is Good A microphone lowered into the collapsed Utah mine detects no signs of life. But rescuers say there's still reason to hope that the six trapped men are alive. Officials at the scene say air quality in the mine was measured and is good enough to sustain the miners.
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No Sign of Miners, But Air in Collapsed Shaft is Good

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No Sign of Miners, But Air in Collapsed Shaft is Good

No Sign of Miners, But Air in Collapsed Shaft is Good

No Sign of Miners, But Air in Collapsed Shaft is Good

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12692581/12692582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A microphone lowered into the collapsed Utah mine detects no signs of life. But rescuers say there's still reason to hope that the six trapped men are alive.

Officials at the scene say air quality in the mine was measured and is good enough to sustain the miners.