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Selling Wrigley Field's Legend Is A Dirty Business

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Selling Wrigley Field's Legend Is A Dirty Business

Strange News

Selling Wrigley Field's Legend Is A Dirty Business

Selling Wrigley Field's Legend Is A Dirty Business

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127054226/127054188" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a time when companies try to monetize names, the Chicago Cubs have figured out how to monetize their dirt. Host Scott Simon reports there's a company selling small vials of dirt from Wrigley Field.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

The Chicago Cubs have a losing record so far this year, and it rains a lot in London. That's life, not news. A company called Steiner Sports now sells small vials of dirt from Wrigley Field - $60 and $30 vials - accompanied by a plaque attesting that the dirt is from Wrigley, not some Chicago dog walk.

At a time when companies try to monetize their names, the Cubs have figured out how to monetize their dirt. Some people sprinkle themselves with water from the spring in Lourdes, France because they believe it has healing powers. If you sprinkle yourself with Wrigley Field dirt, do you get the power to strike out?

(Soundbite of song, "Music Like Dirt")

Mr. DESMOND DEKKER (Musician): (Singing) Music like dirt, for your money's worth. Music like dirt, for your money's worth...

SIMON: Desmond Dekker. You're listening to NPR News.

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