'He-Man' Revived on Web's 'Skeletor Show'

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The Skeletor Show has been a hit on YouTube: many of the re-dubbed clips featuring the arch enemy of He-Man have been viewed over 100,000 times. Daniel Geduld, the dynamic voice of the animated characters, talks about the resurgence.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Daniel Geduld is a voiceover actor, the talent behind the "The Skeletor Show" you can see on YouTube. The show takes snippets from a 1980s cartoon "He-Man" and re-dubs it with his own pantheon of voices, that's a little jangled Rinehart jazz. The clips have become a hit on YouTube. Many of the episodes viewed more than a hundred thousand times.

Here's a clip from the second episode where the character Evil-Lyn offers some advice to Skeletor.

(Soundbite of "The Skeletor Show")

Mr. DANIEL GEDULD (Voice Actor): (As Skeletor): Why do you talk of moisturizers? What are you - what are bubbling on about?

Mr. GEDULD: (As Evil-lin) I was just thinking, your skin, it's just so…

Mr. GEDULD: (As Skeletor) I don't have any skin.

Mr. GEDULD: (As Evil-lin) What?

Mr. GEDULD: (As Skeletor) I don't have any skin. Look at me. Why do you think I'm called Skeletor?

Mr. GEDULD: (As Evil-lin) I just thought your parents gave you a funny name.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIMON: Daniel Geduld joins as now from NPR West. Thanks very much for being with us.

Mr. GEDULD: Thank you.

SIMON: What do you do? So, you just take a look at an old cartoon and start doing voices?

Mr. GEDULD: Yeah. It's a little bit more than that. I take a look at hours of footage and think up what would go well with them and then I edit it together, reanimate bits and pieces here to match up the voices. It takes about probably a week to do.

SIMON: And why "He-Man" as opposes to "Scooby Doo"? Favorites of my daughters. Don't you dare touch "Scooby Doo," please?

Mr. GEDULD: Well, I grew up with "He-Man" and I just thought it was very iconic. I did this really as a whim. It always felt to me like it needed more humor.

SIMON: Now, tell us about the legal fine points. I mean, are you being inspired or just stealing?

Mr. GEDULD: Well, I do put at the very first one that I plagiarized it from film nation and hopefully they won't sue me for it since I'm not making any money off of it. So legally, I'm sure it's in a very nebulous area.

SIMON: Now, you don't get any commercial reward from this.

Mr. GEDULD: Not from that, no. I was out of work for about six or seven months when I started it. It was sort of out of boredom and desperation for something creative to do. And I put the - please hire me, I'm talented - at the end more as a joke than anything thinking, oh, who knows, maybe someone will see it on YouTube and give me a job, but not very helpful.

SIMON: But what happened?

Mr. GEDULD: What happen was, suddenly, it got on Boing Boing, which is a large link site. And it got seen by hundreds of thousand of people. And now I'm getting offers right and left to do voices in cartoons for other people.

SIMON: Goodness gracious. I mean, what YouTube has done for you and Obama Girl is just amazing.

Now, you're in the studios NPR West, right?

Mr. GEDULD: Right.

SIMON: Well, what do you see when you look in the studio?

Mr. GEDULD: I see a control board and monitor, speakers.

SIMON: I apologize. If that speaker became animated, is there a voice that occurs to you?

Mr. GEDULD: For the speaker?

SIMON: Yeah.

Mr. GEDULD: Probably something low, like this.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. GEDULD: It's a hardworking speaker.

SIMON: Yeah. I've worked with that speaker before. That's pretty good. It's been nice talking to you and good luck.

SIMON: Thank you very much.

Daniel Geduld is a voiceover actor and creator of the "The Skeletor Show."

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