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Letters: Yuppie Moms, Video Games, New Mexico

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Letters: Yuppie Moms, Video Games, New Mexico

From Our Listeners

Letters: Yuppie Moms, Video Games, New Mexico

Letters: Yuppie Moms, Video Games, New Mexico

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12721931/12721932" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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We hear from listeners, many of whom expressed strong feelings about last week's pieces on yuppie moms, video game music and New Mexico — the state.

REBECCA ROBERTS, host:

Time now for your letters.

Appalling, said Kate Barker(ph). Obnoxious, said Philly Schepek(ph). Greedy, said Barbara Masoner(ph). Disgusting, said David Rivera(ph). They're all referring to Tovia Smith's piece last week on wealthy families having more children as a status symbol. Krista Sadler(ph) of Flagstaff, Arizona saw the issue in environmental terms. These families will now have a much larger footprint on the land, she writes. They're buying larger houses and vehicles, more clothing and more food. They're using more fuel, water and other non-renewable resources to support themselves, to say nothing of the greenhouse gasses that will be released in the production and use of the trappings of their lifestyles. I would submit that simply because can afford to have large families doesn't mean that we should. If people want larger families, there are many children waiting in orphanages and foster care around the world for parents.

And Mitch B.(ph) of Ann Arbor, Michigan had an interesting take. He writes I wonder if the insecure women who feel the need to reproduce to be trendy will have difficulty explaining to their passel of children why daddy ran off with his thin, attractive and childless secretary.

Another story that generated a lot of anger was a piece by Benjamin Frisch on video game music performed in symphony halls. It wasn't the music that bother people, it was the sentiment expressed by one young boy about his favorite game.

Unidentified Man: It's a game about like crazy things like you attack hippies with baseball bat. I bought a baseball bat but they wouldn't let me come in with it. So…

ROBERTS: So that comment prompted many of you to write, including Nancy Strauss(ph) at South Daytona, Florida, who says I hope I'm not alone in finding it disturbing to hear an 11-year-old boy excitedly talking about a game in which you attack hippies with baseball bats, apparently with the full support of his mother. When our culture portrays gratuitous violence as family fun and entertainment, why are we surprised when we have a Columbine massacre or a Virginia Tech mass shooting?

Finally, many of you enjoyed our story about Americans who don't think the state of New Mexico is actually part of the United States. Anthony Sanchez(ph) from East Lansing, Michigan has experienced it firsthand. I grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico and I too have fallen victim to the ignorance of others, he writes. Since moving to pursue graduate studies in Michigan, I've gotten in the habit of simply saying I'm from Albuquerque. Thanks to Bugs Bunny's frequent wrong turns, at least most people realize that Albuquerque is part of the Union. Unfortunately, most think it's a city in Arizona.

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ROBERTS: You can write to us too. Just go to our Web site, npr.org, and click on the Contact Us link.

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ROBERTS: This is NPR News.

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