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Future Electronics

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Future Electronics

Future Electronics

Future Electronics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1272801/1272802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Most computers today rely on silicon chips to crunch their numbers — but what will the computers of tomorrow use? Host Ira Flatow leads a discussion of the physics and materials science needed to take computing on beyond silicon. We'll hear about technologies from carbon nanotubes to self-assembling surfaces, and talk about the work needed to bring laboratory phenomena onto the desktop. Plus, a look at a transparent transistor.

Guests:

Stanley Williams
* Director, Quantum Science Research
* HP Labs
* Palo Alto, California

Thomas Theis
* Director, Physical Science Research
* IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center
* Yorktown Heights, New York

John Wager
* Professor, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
* Oregon State University
* Corvallis, Oregon

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