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China's Struggling Graduates Bunk In 'Ant Colonies'

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China's Struggling Graduates Bunk In 'Ant Colonies'

Business

China's Struggling Graduates Bunk In 'Ant Colonies'

China's Struggling Graduates Bunk In 'Ant Colonies'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127286874/127286853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In China, more than 6 million graduates hit the job market this year. College enrollment has surged, and the labor market can't keep up. After leaving campus, many grads are forced to bunk together, sometimes six to a room, in crowded apartment buildings in areas known as "ant colonies." Two young men living in one composed an ode to their plight, called "Song of the Ants"

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And for our last word in business, well stick with struggling graduates. In China, more than 6 million graduates hit the job market this year. College enrollment in China has surged, and the labor market can't keep up. Even after leaving campus, many graduates are forced to bunk together - sometimes six to a room - in crowded apartment buildings, in areas known as ant colonies.

Two young men living in one, on the outskirts of Beijing, composed an ode to their plight. It's called "Song of the Ants."

(Soundbite of song, "Song of the Ants")

MONTAGNE: Although we have nothing, we are tough in spirit, they sing. The Wall Street Journal recorded the graduate balladeers, and reports some local officials in charge of the neighborhood are trying to improve conditions. They're replacing old, crumbling buildings with new, low-rent apartments.

Our two singers have now moved to a new, larger room, and they even have their own, private toilet.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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