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Apple Debuts Mobile Ad Network Next Month

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Apple Debuts Mobile Ad Network Next Month

Business

Apple Debuts Mobile Ad Network Next Month

Apple Debuts Mobile Ad Network Next Month

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127552908/127552886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Apple has unveiled the latest version of the iPhone. Among its innovations is iAds, which will make it possible to put ads right in apps. It might be the start of some new creative advertising.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

Apple debuted its newest version of the iPhone yesterday. It will support a slick new kind of advertising called iAds. That should give Apple and its applications, or app developers, a nice chunk of change.

NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

LAURA SYDELL: According to Apple CEO Steve Jobs, it will be possible to put iAds into an app in one afternoon. Apple will sell and design the ads.

Mr. STEVE JOBS (CEO, Apple): What we're trying to do with iAds is we're trying to combine the emotion of video with the interactivity of the Web.

SYDELL: Jobs showed off a yet-to-be-released car ad.

(Soundbite of car ad)

Unidentified Man: The 100 percent electric Nissan Leaf.

SYDELL: The ad for the Nissan took advantage of the gyroscope in the new iPhone form, so Jobs tilted the phone and it changed the color of the car.

The creative minds in advertising are likely to find new ways to use what's available in iAds, says Forrester Research analyst Julie Ask.

Ms. JULIE ASK (Forrester Research): When you talk about the ability to put a gyroscope or proximity sensing location, accelerometers, and mix that into an ad, we could see some very creative results.

SYDELL: Ask says advertisers could take advantage of location services to push customers into a nearby store. Apple will take 40 percent of the revenue generated by the ads. That's a pretty high percentage, say some analysts. But for app makers who've been giving it away for free, this might sound like a good deal.

Laura Sydell NPR News, San Francisco.

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