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New York University Know It's A Costly School

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New York University Know It's A Costly School

Business

New York University Know It's A Costly School

New York University Know It's A Costly School

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For a year now, New York University has been asking incoming students if they really know how much it will cost to go to school there. The school was concerned about sending off some graduates with excessive debt. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports the outreach had no effect on students' decisions. They keep paying $50,000 per year.

DEBORAH AMOS, host:

Our last word in business today: money is no object.

New York University has been tweaking the advice it gives to incoming students. For a year now the university has put the equivalent of a warning label on itself.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Essentially the school would call up and ask: Do really know how much it will cost you to come here?

It wasn't meant to discourage families but the school was concerned about sending off some graduates with excessive debt.

AMOS: This week, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports that NYU has discontinued the year-long program. According to the publication, the outreach effort has had no effect on students' decisions. They keep right on paying $50,000 per year.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Deborah Amos.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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