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Mattel Recalls 9 Million Toys Made in China

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Mattel Recalls 9 Million Toys Made in China

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Mattel issues a recall affecting more than 9 million toys made in China, citing magnets that could be swallowed and possible problems with lead paint. The company's Fisher-Price division recalled 1.5 million preschool toys from a different Chinese supplier earlier this month.

Safety Concerns Prompt Massive Toy Recall

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Mattel Inc., is recalling 9 million toys, including these Batman action figure sets. i

Mattel Inc., is recalling 9 million toys — including these Batman action figure sets — because of safety concerns. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Mattel Inc., is recalling 9 million toys, including these Batman action figure sets.

Mattel Inc., is recalling 9 million toys — including these Batman action figure sets — because of safety concerns.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
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List of Recalled Toys

Toy maker Mattel Inc. on Tuesday issued a recall for 9 million toys made in China because they contain magnets that can be dislodged and swallowed, or they may contain lead paint.

The recall includes 7.3 million play sets, including Polly Pocket dolls and Batman action figures, and 253,000 Sarge brand cars that have lead paint. The 2½-inch, 1-inch high car looks like a military jeep.

Nancy Nord, acting chairman of the U.S. consumer Product Safety Commission, said no injuries have been reported with any of the products involved in the recall.

"The scope of these recalls is intentionally large to prevent any injuries from occurring," she said at a mid-morning news conference.

Also recalled were 345,000 Batman and "One Piece" action figures, 683,000 Barbie and Tanner play sets and 1 million Doggie Day Care play sets.

Mattel chief Bob Eckert said the company is working to create stringent safety standards and is conducting independent tests of its toys to ensure they are safe. After Mattel announced the recall of its Fisher-Price toys, it launched a full-scale investigation into all of its factories in China.

Mattel is offering consumers replacement products in exchange for the recalled items.

It is the second time in less than two weeks that Mattel has recalled toys made in China. The company's Fisher-Price division recalled 1.5 million preschool toys from a different Chinese supplier earlier this month because of lead paint. The toys featured characters such as Dora the Explorer, Big Bird and Elmo. About 967,000 of those toys were sold in the United States between May and August.

Nord said Mattel discovered the latest problem while they were investigating the earlier recall. At Tuesday's news conference, she warned that home test kits are not a reliable way to determine the presence of lead.

After the Fisher-Price recall, Chinese officials temporarily banned the toys' manufacturer, Lee Der Industrial Co., from exporting products. Cheung Shu-hung, one of the company's co-owners, committed suicide at a warehouse over the weekend, a state-run newspaper reported Monday.

Lee Der was under pressure in the global controversy over the safety of Chinese-made products, and it is common for disgraced officials to commit suicide in China.

From NPR reports and The Associated Press

The Dangers of Lead

Lead is highly toxic, and can cause a variety of health problems if inhaled or swallowed in high enough doses. Since the 1980s, federal regulations in the United States have greatly reduced lead exposure by phasing out leaded gasoline, reducing the use of lead pipes in household and commercial plumbing, and banning or limiting the use of lead in many consumer products, such as household paint.

Still, there's some residual lead in the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency offers these tips on where lead is found and how to avoid it.

Where Lead Is Found

Paint: Before 1978, lead-based paint was used in many homes – both inside and outside. If lead-based paint is in good condition, it is usually not a hazard, but peeling or chipping paint could be dangerous. Dust created during the renovation of an old house often contains high levels of lead.

Soil: Lead from exterior paint or other sources, such as leaded gasoline that was used in cars, can accumulate in the soil.

Drinking water: If lead pipes were used for plumbing, drinking water might have unhealthy levels of lead.

Containers: Lead crystal or pottery with a lead-based glaze could leave lead in food or liquids. Experts recommend that wine and other beverages not be stored in lead crystal decanters.

Children and Lead Poisoning

Children are more sensitive to lead poisoning than adults because they are still growing, so their bodies absorb more lead. Those who are 6 years old or younger are most at risk. Young children often put things in their mouths, and some of these objects – such as toys, furniture, or railings — can be covered in lead dust from contaminated dirt or chipped paint.

Lead poisoning in children that goes undetected can lead to slowed growth, hearing problems, behavioral and learning problems. If you think your child might have been exposed to high levels of lead, consult a doctor about getting a simple blood test.

Adults and Lead Poisoning

Adults with high levels of lead in their bodies can suffer from a variety of health problems, including nerve disorders, memory and concentration problems, muscle and joint pain, and digestive difficulties. High levels of lead can also cause difficulties during pregnancy, including harm to the fetus, as well as other reproductive problems for both men and women.

How to Protect Your Family

If you think your home has high levels of lead, get it tested to find out.

Wash children's hands frequently, and keep play areas clean. Keep young children from chewing on painted surfaces, such as windowsills.

Make sure to clean up paint chips, and keep floors, windowsills and other surfaces free of dust that might contain lead. Use a damp sponge or cloth to clean, and rinse it thoroughly when you're done.

Try to keep contaminated soil out of the house by cleaning or removing shoes.

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

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