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Beach Fossils

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Beach Fossils: Song For A Summer 'Vacation'

Beach Fossils: Song For A Summer 'Vacation'

Beach Fossils

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Beach Fossils' "Vacation" captures a sense of cool nonchalance, but also a dose of late-July ennui. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Beach Fossils

Beach Fossils' "Vacation" captures a sense of cool nonchalance, but also a dose of late-July ennui.

courtesy of the artist

Monday's Pick

  • Song: "Vacation"
  • Artist: Beach Fossils
  • CD: Beach Fossils
  • Genre: Rock

The hot weather certainly befits the release of Beach Fossils' eponymous debut, which functions as a perfect companion for the old beach cooler and sunscreen. "Vacation," in particular, isn't just a summer song — it's a deep summer song: a Coke Slurpee in a scorcher, or a sloppy cannonball at a public pool. The sense of cool nonchalance is certainly there, but so is the late-July ennui: "I'm getting on that bus / Got to get out of town / It's all that's on my mind / Leave the city behind."

Between the slosh of reverb and the blithe surf-rock riffs, Beach Fossils' members don't do much to distinguish themselves from fellow coast nostalgists Real Estate or The Drums, but within the context of the song, something like that couldn't matter less. The band is happy to go nowhere for nearly three minutes — buoyed by two interlocking guitar riffs and a three-note bassline — before finally bursting into a bliss-wrought coda. Forget complex songwriting; it's the laziness that makes it work so well, and its finest accomplishment rests in how the spirit of "vacation" is so effectively captured: the humdrum of the present, the eager momentum of travel, and the way the future always seems brightest right as you get the hell out of dodge.

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