Foreign Policy: Goodbye McChrystal, Hello Mattis?

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Gen. James Mattis i i

Gen. James Mattis is a possible replacement for Gen. Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan. Denis Poroy/AP Photo hide caption

itoggle caption Denis Poroy/AP Photo
Gen. James Mattis

Gen. James Mattis is a possible replacement for Gen. Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan.

Denis Poroy/AP Photo

My bet is that Gen. Stanley McChrystal will be gone within a week or so. Defense Secretary Gates canned Admiral Fallon as Central Command chief in the spring of 2007 for less pointed remarks, so he will look like a hypocrite if he does less here in response to McChrystal dissing Obama, Biden, and the White House in a new article in Rolling Stone.

For further insight into what should happen to Gen. Stanley McChrystal read what the editors of National Review and Robert Dreyfuss have to say.

At any rate, it may be time for a whole new team in Afghanistan. My nomination is for Petraeus to step down an echelon and take the Afghanistan command. You could leave him nominally the Centcom chief but let his deputy, Marine Lt. Gen. John Allen, oversee Iraq, the war planning for Iran, and dealing with Pakistan and the Horn of Africa. But more likely is that Petraeus will ask for another Marine general, James Mattis, who is just finishing up at Jiffycom, and who had planned to retire later this year and head home to Walla Walla, Washington. Petraeus and Mattis long have admired each other. The irony is that Mattis has a reputation — unfairly, I think — for speaking a little too bluntly in public about things like killing people. I think Mattis is a terrific, thoughtful leader.

I do wonder if this mess is the result of leaving McChrystal out there too long-he has been going non-stop for several years, first in Iraq and then in Afghanistan. At any rate, his comments reflect a startling lack of discipline. He would expect more of one of his captains. We should expect more of him. I know, I've said worse about Biden. But part of my job is to comment on these things, even flippantly sometimes. Part of his job is not to.

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